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RWBY - Weiss Schnee - 1/8 (Di molto bene)

RWBY - Weiss Schnee - 1/8 (Di molto bene)
Kategori
Ursprung
Karaktär
Material
Skala & Dimensioner
1/8  H=240mm (9.36in, 1:1=1.92m)
Släppdatum
12/2017 As Standard
Pris
Japanska
8,382 visningar • 48 kommentarer14 favoriter

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In stock @ Ninoma (MFC Partner) (¥18,227)

Product page : www.ninoma.com/...
Official new item , shipped worldwide from Japan
About 162 USD | 137 EUR | 202 CAD
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Available for pre-order @ Solaris Japan

Pre-Order at Solaris Japan!
└ Check product page for details.
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Available for pre-order @ Anime NPC
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Product Page: www.animenpc.co...

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4 månader sedan
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Might look reeeeally good next to ITEM #126835. Floating fencing buddies!!
4 månader sedan
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Merilly (5 månader sedan) #23048863I wouldn't say incorrectly but would rather compare it to descriptive and prescriptive grammer. In normal speech and writing, people use language a bit more freely than the rules would allow. In a way, it is to make things easier because none of us want to think that deeply about what is said to be 'correct' as long as it brings the point across.
And then there's the fact that some words changed their spelling so often that you can't help but be confused about what is actually the correct form. In the end, language is continuously changing and most adjustments are taken rather freely. Personally, I don't use ß that much and just use double s instead. German has more or less the same debate with f and ph. We had so many spelling reforms that no one seems to care all that much anymore who uses what in everyday life.

True, language (except for Latin) change everyday just like everything else. In English, I believe people who use it try to use the bare minimum to get their point across, whether it be correct or incorrect. However, I don't believe English speakers challenge the correct spelling of words, but more so on how to pronounce them. Still, nobody really has time to think about trivial things like that.
5 månader sedan
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okami34 (5 månader sedan) #23028891Thank you for clarifying that. People use certain characters incorrectly to making things easier and not because it is correct then?

I wouldn't say incorrectly but would rather compare it to descriptive and prescriptive grammer. In normal speech and writing, people use language a bit more freely than the rules would allow. In a way, it is to make things easier because none of us want to think that deeply about what is said to be 'correct' as long as it brings the point across.
And then there's the fact that some words changed their spelling so often that you can't help but be confused about what is actually the correct form. In the end, language is continuously changing and most adjustments are taken rather freely. Personally, I don't use ß that much and just use double s instead. German has more or less the same debate with f and ph. We had so many spelling reforms that no one seems to care all that much anymore who uses what in everyday life.
5 månader sedan
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Thank you for clarifying that. People use certain characters incorrectly to making things easier and not because it is correct then?Merilly (5 månader sedan) #22961836They're not interchangeable per se. In reality, a lot of people interchange them freely, but in school, you'll get marked down for it. The spelling is changed rather often in Germany and in some forms ß is not allowed to be used. For example, in crossword puzzles, some official forms and even addresses had this.
That also applies to ä, ö and ü (ï and ë don't exist in German). Their original forms are ae, oe and ue but someone must have thought that might be confusing for pronunciation or something so we got those. Those are interchangeable however. Though you still can't use them in certain forms.
5 månader sedan
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Available for pre-order @ GoodsRepublic
Free Shipping woldwide from Japan.
Sold at Goods Republic ==> goodsrepublic.c...
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okami34 (5 månader sedan) #22879068So ,ß and ss are interchangeable? That's interesting!
(I can understand how the U.S and the UK are similar in terms of spelling.) Did you learn German as a for your foreign language?
Umlauts? Are ä,ë,ï,ö, and ü more unique letters from the German language? Do they have interchangeable counterparts as well?


They're not interchangeable per se. In reality, a lot of people interchange them freely, but in school, you'll get marked down for it. The spelling is changed rather often in Germany and in some forms ß is not allowed to be used. For example, in crossword puzzles, some official forms and even addresses had this.
That also applies to ä, ö and ü (ï and ë don't exist in German). Their original forms are ae, oe and ue but someone must have thought that might be confusing for pronunciation or something so we got those. Those are interchangeable however. Though you still can't use them in certain forms.
5 månader sedan
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